2017 Introduction by Santee Frazier

“So while the Progressives allow the noble savage to be the guardian of the wilds and on occasion the conscience of ecological responsibility, the end result of their view for Indians is the same as its counterpart view of American Indians as howling denizens of a terrifying wilderness.” –Paula Gunn Allen “It is our awareness of the spirit of a…

2016 Introduction by Joan Naviyuk Kane

Our Literary Homes: An Introduction to the 2016 Edition Illiruq, in the King Island dialect of Inupiaq, means “(s)he is building a house.” One makes poems through the construction of stanzas. Metaphorically and etymologically, poems, like houses, are made of little rooms, places for dwelling. Aside from the formulaic ways in which one self-consciously tries to come at introductions like…

2015 Introduction by LeAnn Howe

A little over a decade ago I published “The Story of America: A Tribalography,” discussing how Native authors pull together all the elements of their tribe—meaning the people, the land, multiple characters, and all their manifestations and revelations—and connect these in past, present, and future milieus. I argued that “tribalography” comes from the Native propensity for bringing things together, for…

2014 Introduction by Irving Morris

Yá’át’ééh. Shí éí bilagáanaa k’ehji Irvin Morris dashijiní. Tábaahíéí nishlí dóó Tótsohnii éí báshíshchíín. Tó’áhaníéí dashicheii dóó Kinyaa’áanii éí dashinálí. Nahashch’idí hoolyéédóóéííyisí naashá. K’ad éí T’iists’óóz hoolyédi Diné bee hódehgo bidziilgo óólt’a’ígii, Navajo Technical University hoolyéegii éí naashnish. Bilagáanaa bizaad éí bína’nishtin. Saad naach’aah aldóó’ bína’nishtin. Kwít’éego éí Diné nishlí. Greetings. My English name is Irvin Morris. I am of the Edgewater…

A Special Message from Luci Tapahonso

Four years ago, I wrote the following lines memorializing one of my last times with my mother: “We were alone in the quiet house. Across the road, a cow bellowed and somewhere by the wash, Dogs were barking playfully. One sounded like a puppy. Here in the living room, we rested, closing our eyes. Then she said, with her eyes…

2013 Introduction by N. Scott Momaday

As a writer and a Native American I want to encourage you who are students to write. Writing offers a significant challenge—it is not easy—but it offers rewards that are extremely worthwhile. As native people, you have a wonderful and unique heritage, and you have the opportunity to celebrate and preserve that heritage through writing. You have great subject, one…

2012 Introduction by Gordon Henry

The Transformative Power of Writing Due to space constraints within the print edition of the magazine, the staff at Tribal College Journal could only print a portion of Gordon Henry’s original essay. We would like to thank Henry for his generosity of spirit in recognizing the student writers featured in this year’s issue of TCJ Student. I am honored to…

2011 Introduction by Mark Turcotte

I was pleased when Laura Paskus, interim editor at Tribal College Journal, contacted me to ask if I’d be willing to be part of the annual Student Edition of the magazine, featuring its writing competition. I was especially pleased to know that I wasn’t being asked to judge the contest but instead to read the selections and write an introduction….

2010 Introduction by Gloria Emerson

The winners and best entries from the 2010 TCJ Student Writing Contest.

2009 Introduction by Joseph M. Marshall III

Introduction By Joseph M. Marshall, III Life teaches us, or will, that if anything is predictable in an unpredictable world it is change. Indeed, change has been a fact of life for those of us who are indigenous to North America, and too often it has been difficult and even traumatic. But, as the multitude of nations and cultures we…

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